Abrupt Change

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Abrupt Change

The drought we experienced earlier this month has come to a definitive end, and we’re now facing some very different fishing conditions. It took a lot of rain to fill the low water table and we recovered two months worth of precipitation in about two and a half days. If the forecast for most of the Lower Peninsula is correct, we expect to see high and dirty water for a week or more. Look for quick-draining tributaries and creeks which should have better clarity.


 

Anglers have had success streamer fishing and this may be the name of the game for the next couple of days. If it’s overcast and the water has some stain, stick to dark colors which are easier for fish to see. As with everything in our highly-scientific-yet-totally-a-crapshoot world of fishing, don’t hesitate to try something different. (Bright white worked really well during a rainstorm earlier this week.) 


We had a great season of hex fishing! The bugs and fish cooperated and we were happy to hear that a lot of folks took the time to measure water temperatures and handle fish with care. A few hex can be found up north, but the epic spinnerfalls are behind us. Isonychia are still active. Iso’s don’t mind cooler overcast weather, in fact those conditions can make for some great fishing especially at dusk. 

CREATURE FEATURE
Great Blue Heron


Herons and egrets are wading birds that use their long sharp beaks to hunt for fish, small reptiles, amphibians, crayfish, and other prey. These birds fly with their neck tucked back toward their body, making them easy to distinguish from cranes (which fly with their necks outstretched). If you look at a great blue heron’s face up close, you’ll notice that their eyes are angled downward. This is an evolutionary trait that helps the heron to stalk prey without using excessive head movement. Great blue herons live to be 15 years old on average. 

Good luck everyone and have a great week!